Centre for Scottish Culture Blog

History Scotland Webinar Series

Our History lecturer, Dr Allan Kennedy, has teamed up with History Scotland magazine to host an exciting webinar series. Beginning in 2020 as a attempt to keep History fans engaged during lockdown, the webinar series proved so popular that History Scotland has now announced its continuation into 2022 and beyond. Topics covered so far have

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Scotland and the Low Countries

We are excited to announce that our Senior Lecturer in History, Dr Martine Van Ittersum, will be appearing in an upcoming radio series exploring the historical relationship between Scotland and the Low Countries. ‘Scotland the Low Countries’ is a two-part series presented by Billy Kay which celebrates  Scotland’s historic links with the Flemish and Dutch

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Leaving the Cold Country

In an exclusive preview of his new book, Professor Graeme Morton explores the rise of meteorological science in the nineteenth century, and asks how it might have related to the Scottish experience of mass emigration. Even when the rain and temperature gauge, the barometer and anemometer were commonly used to record meteorological observations, the popularity

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Imagining Union before the Union

The Union of 1707 did not come out of nowhere; Scots had been discussing the concept almost ceaselessly throughout the 17th century. Dr Allan Kennedy outlines the major models of Union they came up with, demonstrating that the form adopted in 1707 was by no means the only possible version. Follow Allan of Twitter at

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Dying to Invest: Scotland and the Tontine

A plot-point in numerous books, films, and TV shows, the tontine is among the most notorious financial products every devised. But, as Dr Andrew McDiarmid explains, this most infamous of investment schemes had a notable – and broadly positive – impact on Scotland during the early 19th century. Follow Andrew on Twitter at @apmcdiarmid1. From

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Dundee Historian wins Local History Prize!

The Centre for Scottish Culture was delighted to learn that our History Lecturer, Dr Allan Kennedy, has been awarded the inaugural Birlinn Prize for Scottish Local History! The prize is awarded annually to the best paper published in the journal Scottish Local History. Allan’s paper, which was named-joint winner, is entitled ‘Cromwell’s Highland Stronghold: The

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Publishing Success for our PhD Researcher!

The Centre for Scottish Culture was delighted to learn that our PhD candidate, Sylvia Valentine, has recently succeeded in publishing some of her exciting research! Sylvia’s article, ‘Meet the vegetarian anti-vaxxers who led the smallpox inoculation backlash in Victorian Britain’, appeared in the most recent issue of Little Doric: The Journal of the Aberdeen Branch

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Seven Deadly Tales: Halloween with Walter Scott

  Although the great Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott is most famous as a historical novelist, his work is also notable for frequently exploring supernatural themes. With Halloween just behind us, Dr Daniel Cook delves into Scott’s prose and picks out seven of his spookiest stories. Follow Daniel on Twitter at @drdanielcook.   Still revered as one

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The Crook of Devon Witches

  With Hallowe’en nearly upon us, Dr Allan Kennedy gets into the spooky spirit by telling the story of the supposed witches’ coven discovered in Crook of Devon, Kinross-shire, in 1662.   Follow Allan on Twitter at: @Allan_D_Kennedy    Between 1563 and 1736, roughly 4,000 Scots, mainly women, were accused of witchcraft. Of these, perhaps 2,500 were

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The Bandit of Callander: Crime and Marginality in Restoration Scotland

  Dr Allan Kennedy tells the story of the little-known bandit Calum Og McGrigor, who terrorised the Stirlingshire area throughout the 1660s, and asks what his crimes can tell us about deviance and marginality in 17th-century Scotland.   Follow Allan on Twitter at: @Allan_D_Kennedy    Banditry was a major problem in 17th-century Scotland, particularly the Highlands.

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